Living with a neurological condition - students 'hear it as it is'

Living with a neurological condition - students 'hear it as it is'

University of Cumbria students following courses in professional health care took part in a ‘Neuro Study Day’ at the Fusehill Street campus recently, where they heard from some of those affected by neurological conditions, and their carers, regarding the reality of living with a long-term condition.

The session, which brought together students from occupational therapy, physiotherapy, nursing, social work, psychology and other health and social care programmes, was aimed at developing their knowledge and understanding of neurological conditions such as acquired brain injury, Motor Neurone Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and Huntingdon’s disease.

One very powerful presentation was given by Natalli Fisher and her mum Kathleen Fisher, who reflected on the consequences of Natalli’s life-changing road traffic accident in 2015, how they have dealt with the outcomes, and their experience of working with the various professionals they encountered throughout their journey.

PR1903, Two females

Right: Natalli and Kathleen Fisher

Susie Wilson, senior lecturer and programme leader for occupational therapy said:

“Study days such as these are essential to help develop students’ knowledge and understanding of multidisciplinary team working and their eventual role as a health professional in supporting people with neuro conditions, as well as their carers. Hearing from someone who is actually experiencing the condition and currently receiving services from health and care professionals gives the students a real insight into what will be required from them once they qualify, and teaches them to see issues from the point of view of the client as well as the providers."

Agencies from around the county/region came together to deliver a most valuable learning experience for the students. Representatives included Yvonne Trace, MS Society; Sue Muller, Regional Care Development Adviser, Motor Neurone Disease Association; Louise Chance, Director, A Chance for Life Ltd; Glenys Marriott, Chair Cumbria Neurological Alliance & Headway South Cumbria; Vincent Foxworthy, Headway North Cumbria & Cumbria Neurological Alliance committee member; Angie Stewart, Regional External Relations Officer, MS Society; and Vivienne Rogerson, Area Development Manager Parkinsons UK..

Aideen Carroll, a final year MSc Occupational Therapy student summed up her experience of the day: “It’s amazing to have people stand up and tell their story – it just makes it very much person centred, and that’s what occupational therapy is all about.”

Picture (top right) shows Susie Wilson, Programme Lead, MSc Occupational therapy; Yvonne Trace, MS Society; Sue Muller, Regional Care Development Adviser, Motor Neurone Disease Association; Louise Chance, Director, A Chance for Life Ltd; Glenys Marriott, Chair Cumbria Neurological Alliance & Headway South Cumbria; Vincent Foxworthy, Headway North Cumbria & Cumbria Neurological Alliance committee member; Angie Stewart, Regional External Relations Officer, MS Society; Vivienne Rogerson, Area Development Manager Parkinsons UK.

.