University of Cumbria has first students in the UK to graduate with BSc (Hons) degrees in Radiation Protection

University of Cumbria has first students in the UK to graduate with BSc (Hons) degrees in Radiation Protection  name

The first students in the country to graduate with honours degrees in radiation protection, did so at the University of Cumbria's graduation ceremonies last week.

Professor Peter Cole, president of the Society for Radiation Protection congratulated them, saying: "This is a landmark in the radiation protection community and the success of the students is very valuable to the profession."

The four students, Gayle Faragher, Allison Hollerin, Joy Hetherington (who all received 2:1s) and David Denwood (the first student to receive a 1st in this subject) all work at Sellafield.

Students study for the radiation protection degree part-time while working full-time in a radiation protection role. Generally they study for a foundation degree first, then proceed to the BSc (Hons) top-up degree. 

Alan Marsh, who is programme leader and senior lecturer for the radiation protection courses at the university, said:

“Students undertaking these courses have significantly enhanced their careers. One has achieved the status of becoming an radiation protection adviser (RPA) before completing the degree, another has landed a prestigious role in health physics at a European research facility. In 2014 the course won the Nuclear Training Award for ‘Training Course of the Year – Over 6 months’ (the awards are sponsored by Nuclear Engineering International). The judges praised degrees in radiation protection from the University of Cumbria for addressing a real industry need.

“This is a historic day for radiation protection - these mature part-time students are the first in the UK to graduate with a BSc (Hons) in Radiation Protection, a justified reward and recognition for all their hard work in balancing home-life, studying and the work place over the years. As one student remarked ‘I wouldn’t have thought this was possible five years ago before we started this course’.”

 

Image caption: Professor Peter Cole (centre) with (LtoR) Gayle Faragher, Allison Hollerin, Joy Hetherington (who all received 2:1s) and David Denwood