As research degree students you are a member of our Graduate School, benefiting from practical and pastoral support on your research degree journey

Research Skills Development Programme

The University of Cumbria offers a comprehensive range of workshops which aim to help students to develop and broaden their research and personal transferable skills.

Research and Knowledge Exchange delivers the Research Skills Development Programme, which provides a range of free workshops for all research staff and postgraduate research students. Our workshops are linked to the Research Development Framework descriptors, for more information visit Vitae RDF webpage.

Research Development Framework

The Research Development Framework is a tool for planning, promoting and supporting the personal, professional and career development of researchers in higher education.

Training Needs Analysis

This tool is designed to help you understand your skillset and map your training needs as a researcher.  It is mapped to the Vitae Research Development Framework. The Training Needs Analysis form can be found Training Needs Analysis Form. For further information on research skills please email research.office@cumbria.ac.uk

Upcoming Workshops

The individual workshop descriptions can be found on the Graduate School BlackBoard site.

Workshop RDF Descriptor
Creativity in Research Design  A1, A2, A3
Thesis submission briefing for final year students     B1, B2, B3
Induction for new starters (Oct 2020)  B1, B2, C2, D1, D2 
Introduction to R (Oct 2020)  A1, B3, D2 
Planning for Progression for continuing students (Oct 2020)  B1, B2, C2, D1, D2 
Getting your Research Published  A1, A2, A3, B1, B2, B3, C1, C2, D1, D2, D3 
Introduction to ATLAS.ti (Nov 2020) A1, B3, D2 
Conducting Systematic Literature Review   A1, A2, A3, B1, B2, B3 
Introduction to Qualitative Analysis with NVivo (Nov 2020) A1, B3, D2 
Managing Expectations of stakeholders to Enhance Project Outcomes D1, D2, D3 
Approaches to Reflective Practice: Making the Most of Failed Strategies  A2, A3, B1, B2, B3 
Pursuing your research beyond your doctorate B1, B2, B3, D1, D2, D3 
Engagement and impact: the research practice nexus D1, D2, D3 
Qualitative Methodologies: Investigating Power A1, A2, A3 
'Creative Data' Collection and Analysis A1, A2, A3 
How to secure funding for your research B3, C2, C3 
Imposter syndrome  B1, B2, B3, D1 
Cross Cultural Differences in Interpreting and Doing Research A1, A2, A3   
Process for PhD transfer/confirmation panel  A2, A3, B1, B2, D1, D2 
Ethical Research and Ethical Approval A2, C2, C3  
Induction for new starters (Jan 2021) B1, B2, C2, D1, D2 
Engagement and impact-Global Citizenship  D1, D2, D3 
Phenomenography A1, A2, A3 
Action Research: Types, Strengths and Challenges A1, A2, A3 
Applying For Academic Jobs B1, B2, B3 
Introduction to R (Feb 2021) A1, B3, D2 
Research Impact A3, C1, C2, C3, D1, D2, D3 
Putting Yourself Out There: Research Confidence for Conferences B1, B2, B3, D1, D2, D3 
Considering the self, reflexivity and bias in the PhD journey B1, B2, B3 
Case Study Methodology A1, A2, A3 
How to use statistics to best effect in your doctoral work A1, A2, A3  
Supervisions: How to make them work for you B1, B2, D1 
Introduction to ATLAS.ti (March 2021) A1, B3, D2 
Introduction Qualitative Analysis with NVivo (Mar 2021) A1, B3, D2  
Stop Thinking Critically!  A1, A2, A3 
Theoretical perspectives in research: paradigms, turns and posts A1, A2, A3 
Participatory Research – A Philosophical and Practical Guide A1, A2, A3, D1, D2, D3 
Induction for new starters (Apr 2021) B2, B3, C2, D1, D2 
Academic Writing Retreat (2 day - Apr 2021) A2, A3, B2, B3, C2, D2 
Planning for Progression for continuing students (Apr 2021) B1, B2, C2, D1, D2 
Induction to Teaching A1, A3 
Quantitative Research Methods A1, A2, A3
Conducting Systematic Literature Reviews A1, A2, A3
Academic Writing Retreat (2 day - July 2021) A2, A3, B2, B3, C2, D2  

Advice and Support

Advice and training suggestions aimed at the different stages of your PhD.

Your PhD Journey

PhD programmes are usually completed over a three or four year period. Below is a short summary of the different stages of your PhD with recommendations of research support.

 

Timeline of your journey

New PhD Students

FT: Year 1 / PT: Year 1 & 2

Beginning your PhD can be daunting but it is an exciting time to further develop your research aims and acquire specific skills or tools you need to carry out your research. The workshops will help you to make the most of the early phase of your PhD.

Recommended workshops:

  • Introduction, induction for new starters
  • How to use statistics to best effect in your doctoral work
  • Supervisions: How to make them work for you
  • Creativity in Research Design
  • Ethical Research and Ethical Approval

Mid-stages PhD Student

FT: Year 2 / PT: Year 2 & 4

As you immerse yourself in your research, this is a time to review progress and reflect on how far you have come, and examine if there are any skills to develop further.  The workshops aimed at mid-stage will focus on managing your research and start to put it in a broader professional context.

Recommended workshops:

  • Putting Yourself Out There: Research Confidence for Conferences
  • Planning for Progression for continuing students
  • Getting your Research Published
  • 'Creative Data' Collection and Analysis
  • Theoretical perspectives in research

Writing up your PhD and Preparing for Viva

FT: Year 3 / PT: Year 4 & 5

This stage is dominated by writing your thesis, and a key time to familiarise yourself with the thesis formatting, submission and examination procedures and regulations.  This is also an opportunity to look ahead at what you want to do next, and setting aside time to communicate your research with others and the potential impact of your research.

Recommended workshops:

  • Thesis submission briefing for final year students
  • Academic Writing Retreat
  • Pursuing your research beyond your doctorate
  • Research Impact

Guidance and Policy

The Postgraduate Research Code of Practice sets out the provision made for our research degrees to meet the UK quality code for Higher Education. 

It can be read in conjunction with the Code of Practice for research, which sets out the principles of good research conduct and integrity expected of all researchers at Cumbria.

The Graduate School Handbook guides you through your research degree journey. It outlines the responsibilities for both you and your supervisors.

Note: the Handbook is revised and updated each academic year.

Research Student Resources

The Graduate School will provide you with all the information you need to support your research journey. Policy, guidance and links to other resources you will need during your time at the University of Cumbria will be available on the Blackboard site through the Student Hub.

This includes access to University wide student support services including disability support and library resources.

We have three dedicated PgR Study Rooms

  • Lancaster - Bishop Cross (next to the library) BC 002  - key code for out of hours
  • Carlisle - Fusehill Street - Bowscale (ground floor) BS 8 - key code entry
  • Ambleside - Charlotte Mason (ground floor) CMB 0.03

If you wish to use the rooms please contact the graduateschool@cumbria.ac.uk for the key codes for Carlisle & Lancaster, and how to access Ambleside. All rooms are available to all research students.

You can also update your personal details through the Student Hub

Contact

For further information on the PhD journey, email: graduateschool@cumbria.ac.uk

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